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Marc Chagall

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(1887-1985)

 

Marked by his childhood spent in his family's home in Byelorussia, Chagall arrived in Paris in 1910 where he made friends with Blaise Cendrars, Max Jacob and Apollinaire.

He was considered as the precursor of surrealism by André Breton.

His highly personal iconography stemmed from childhood memories and his in-depth knowledge of Judaism.

The poetic and exuberant qualities of his work earned him numerous commissions including the decoration of the Opéra de Paris, UN headquarters and Israeli Parliament.

 

 

 

Excerpt from Marie-Hélène Reynaud's book "d’art et de papier" 

Affiche d’Italie, 1983, pencil, China ink and wash on Montgolfier vellum paper, 65x50cm. Paris, Musée d’Art Moderne. ©  ADAGP © Collection Centre Pompidou, Dist. RMN / Philippe Migeat

  • Affiche d’Italie, 1983, pencil, China ink and wash on Montgolfier vellum paper, 65x50cm. Paris, Musée d’Art Moderne.

©  ADAGP

© Collection Centre Pompidou, Dist. RMN / Philippe Migeat