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Back Canson and Yesterday's Artists

Matisse, Picasso, Maillol, Warhol… all the great artists have used Canson papers. Still today, painters, draughtsmen, fashion designers, cartoonists and other artists draw inspiration from the Canson range.

Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres

(1780-1867)

Dominique Ingres was an adolescent when Etienne de Montgolfier died, but soon after, he became friends with his daughter Adélaïde – a woman of letters living in the capital – of whom he did a portrait. For his drawings, he wanted a paper with a sharp memory...

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Edgar Degas

(1834-1917)

Initially influenced by Ingres, Degas was subsequently attracted by the world of theatre and dance which, along with horse races, became his favourite subjects. Degas was friends with Manet, Monet and Renoir, and took part in the first exhibition of the Impressionists in 1874 with ten paintings, including two on dancers. He...

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Pablo Picasso

1881-1973)

After his blue and pink periods, Pablo Picasso experimented with cubism with Braque. Picasso went through and got the most out of all 20th century avant-garde movements, from primitivism to surrealism, and from neoclassicism to abstraction. After the Second World War, in Vallauris, his paintings became more...

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Marc Chagall

(1887-1985)

Marked by his childhood spent in his family's home in Byelorussia, Chagall arrived in Paris in 1910 where he made friends with Blaise Cendrars, Max Jacob and Apollinaire. He was considered as the precursor of surrealism by André Breton. His highly personal iconography stemmed from childhood memories and his in-depth...

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Fernand Léger

(1881-1955)

French painter Fernand Léger initially came to Paris, where he was to remain, to study fine art at the Beaux-Arts. After quitting architectural school, he turned to Decorative Arts. He was particularly marked by the work of Cézanne, of whom he said he had learned "the love of shapes and volumes". During his cubist period...

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Aristide Maillol

(1861-1944)

Aristide Maillol – a friend of Bourdelles, Matisse and Picasso – was a genuine creator of forms and is known for his sculptures of pure rounded figures. But he was also a painter who produced strong, often sensual works like those representing his young model Dina Vierny. In 1910...

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